Tuesday, March 10, 2009

On The Board

I entered my 3rd BBT4 event last night, and would score my first cash/points of the series.  A pretty typical run overall, though I felt pretty card dead as opposed to the big game where I caught a ton of big starting hands.  Early on, I was played back at a bunch preflop, and never really had any actual hands to stay in with.  Because, I play so tight preflop, it is rare where I feel like every preflop open I make is getting re-raised, but that was how it felt. 

I was about even at T3000 around 45 minutes in when I picked up KK in UTG+1.  The table was pretty aggressive, so I decided to go ahead and limp it for T100, and hope for an expected raise behind me.  A couple of limps behind me, and it was not looking good until Breeze, raised it up to about 1500.  Presto!  That’s why you limp KK early at an agro table.  I decide to just jam it, because I figure Breeze can’t fold at this point.  Based on the size of the bet, I figured Breeze for 88-QQ or AK, and was surprised to see the other two kings.  We would chop it up.

As we approached two hours in, I was still skipping along the bottom of the leader board with about 3-4k in chips.  The blinds and antes were getting pretty steep, and I went on a little mini run, of jamming preflop and snaking the blinds to get to about 6500 in chips.  At this point in the MTT small to middle pairs get tough to play.  Because I like mining with small pairs, but my stack is not big enough, those usually get mucked.  Middle pairs are tough to muck when you have a small M and are looking at an unopened pot.  Same goes with big aces.  So I had clawed my way and stayed alive without too many showdowns to this point, and just a couple of big starting hands.  I pick up AKs in the SB.  It folds to the button who jams for just less than my entire stack.  I wrote about this exact situation in a live MTT a while back.  In that case, I figured I was deep enough, and had a big enough skill advantage to avoid a possible coin flip for elimination at that point.  Even with all of that going for you it is still probably a bad fold.  If you told the button that you will auto-call from a blind with AKs, I don’t think they could exploit that knowledge.  It’s just too rare that the button has AA or KK when they are open jamming in that situation.  There are too many weak aces in their range to not call with AKs.  So I called, and was facing a weak ace (A8o), and doubled through to 13.k moving into the top 10.

From this point we would work our way through the cash bubble and down to the FT bubble.  I had plenty of chips to make the FT, but I was after the much more valuable win here.  I picked up my second big pair of the tournament close to three hours in when I looked down at the mighty KK.  This time I was in a blind, and there was a limp or two, before one of the chip leaders opened to about 4.8k.  I had about 13k, so I could just jam here, but I figured delaying to the flop could get me a sure double up.  So I just called hoping to avoid an ace on the flop.  Flop came down J55 with two diamonds, and I figured I was safe as could be.  With the preflop raise size I don’t think he has a 5.  I should be ahead of all but AA or JJ.  I checked to the better.  The preflop raiser continuation bet for another 5k or so, and I shoved.  Pretty quick call.  I am against Ad8d for a flush draw with an over.  I have the Kd so that helps a bit, but this is basically a coinflip.  The Queen of Diamonds comes on the turn, and I am drawing dead on a 25k+ pot.  IGHN 10/71.  That one was pretty tough.  25k would have put me in great shape at the FT and I was due to start catching some cards.  I think if I jam preflop there I get called anyway.  It’s too bad the A8s hit the flop so hard.  There is a great chance that an A8 with no flush draw, c-bets there anyway, and is forced to call my jam from way behind.

So at least I am on the board I guess which don’t mean much.  Getting the win is all that matters.  I will probably try to play one a week if the marriage can survive it.

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